15 Signs it May be Time to Leave Your Job

 

Like any job, there are positives and negatives. Good days and bad days. Some days you might ask yourself, “I wonder if I should start looking for another job?”, but other days you tell yourself, “No, I think I’ll stay put.” If this describes you, and you’re constantly going back and forth with what to do, here are 15 signs it may be time to move on:

  1. You dread going to work
  2. When you come home from work you’re irritable more often than not
  3. You have trouble falling asleep or wake up in the middle of the night thinking of work
  4. Your job is making you feel down and somewhat depressed
  5. You dread Sunday nights and the thought of going to work on Monday
  6. You have no energy during the work week
  7. You live for the weekend
  8. Your employer or company doesn’t have the same values as you
  9. You don’t find fulfillment in your job anymore
  10. You have tried to grow in your career, but your job (or your manager) is not letting you
  11. You contributions are not valued
  12. Your colleagues or others at work are rude to you
  13. The work environment is very negative and/or toxic
  14. There have been several layoffs and/or turnover is high
  15. You have a gut feeling something may be happening to your job

If you’ve checked off several of these signs, and you’ve even tried to remedy some of the situations, then it may be time to dust off your resume and move on. Change is always scary, but there comes a time when you need to look out for your well-being and for the future of your career.

Photo credit: Canva

Wait! Before You Resign, Read These Tips

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People change jobs for various reasons. Some want new challenges or want to move up the ladder, while others want to downsize their careers. Of course there are others who want to switch jobs because of a boss they don’t like, poor company culture, or maybe added responsibilities but no pay increase. Whatever the reason(s), here are some important tips to remember:

  1. Always give at least a two-week notice. Even if your new company wants you to start as soon as possible, they will understand and would expect the same from their employees. Further, in the eyes of your new employer, leaving immediately may reflect poorly on your character.
  2. Your resignation letter should show respect and professionalism. Even if you’re leaving under some “not-so-good” terms, don’t burn any bridges. It’s a small world.
  3. Ask for a letter of recommendation (or LinkedIn recommendation) from your supervisor and/or colleagues. Recommendations can be important tools in future job searches.
  4. Prior to submitting your resignation, be sure you have copies or forward any congratulatory emails, thank yous, etc., that showcase your skills and accomplishments. The reason for obtaining these prior to your resignation, is that in some industries, it is not uncommon to ask the individual to resign to leave immediately.
  5. Remain in contact with past supervisors and/or coworkers. These individuals know first-hand your skills and talents and keeping in touch may lead to new opportunities. In addition, if you ever find yourself suddenly without a job, you have an immediate network to draw upon and will not have to reestablish a relationship.

Many people don’t think twice about typing up their resignation, but utilizing these tips is an important part about good career management.

Image by adamr@freedigitalphotos.net

Why give a two weeks’ notice?

Most people leave an employment situation because they are unhappy with something, and sometimes an individual is tempted to leave right away. But here are three reasons why it’s important to give a two weeks’ notice: 

(1) It’s customary
(2) It’s important to leave your current employer on good terms
(3) In the eyes of your new employer, leaving immediately may reflect poorly on your character.

Don’t leave hastily; you may regret it later.